0

State-level guidance regarding air filtration systems in hospitals and healthcare facilities in light of COVID-19 appears to vary greatly over the last six months. Some states still do not mention filtration systems at all, while others merely point to national organizations for guidance. A number of states specify in detail things to consider specifically for dentists. The strictest measures found were in the State of California, which regulates COVID-19 under the requirements of the state’s Aerosol Transmissible Diseases standard.

References to National Organizations

  • A number of states list links to CDC guidelines regarding air control and filtration, including the Iowa Department of Public Health.
  • Some states, such as the Arizona Department of Health Services, make no specific filtration recommendations “in accordance with the World Health Organization and the low risk of airborne transmission.”
  • Other states, such as the Wyoming Department of Health, do not mention filtration systems at all, yet provide a link to the CDC for additional guidance.

State of California

  • The State of California Department of Industrial Relations calls COVID-19 an airborne infectious disease, and as such it is regulated under the requirements of the The Aerosol Transmissible Diseases (ATD) standard (California Code of Regulations, title 8, section 5199).
  • The ATD standard provides strict guidelines for hospitals and healthcare facilities. Specifically regarding air circulation, the following criteria must be observed: isolate infected persons in airborne infection isolation rooms, conduct high-hazard procedures in airborne infection isolation rooms, ventilate rooms to a removal efficiency of 99.9% in accordance with this CDC table, use airtight barriers to eliminate worker exposure, and use local exhaust ventilation, HEPA air filtration and air disinfection in patient areas.

Multnomah County (Oregon)

  • The county page highlights in bold that “experts don’t yet fully understand the role that HVAC systems play in transmitting COVID-19 indoors.” However, it also states that “most experts agree that a state-of-the-art, modern HVAC system that exchanges outdoor air for indoor air and has excellent filtration reduces the risk of spreading COVID-19.”
  • The county recommends that older buildings with systems that recirculate air do the following: open windows, use portable air purifiers with HEPA filters, and use “filters with a Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating of 13 or higher in the building’s HVAC system.”
  • The county also provides links to guidelines published by The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), and CDC.

Minnesota Department of Health

Pennsylvania Department of Health

  • The Pennsylvania Department of Health provides detailed measures to follow in dental settings, and outlines specific guidelines from the CDC regarding ventilation systems.
  • The website states, “CDC does not provide guidance on the decontamination of building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems potentially exposed to SARS-CoV-2. To date, CDC has not identified confirmatory evidence to demonstrate that viable virus is contaminating these systems.”
  • The website makes recommendations pertaining to the proper maintenance of HVAC systems, including the use of portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) air filtration units when performing high aerosol generating procedures.
  • Additionally, the website recommends using an upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) to increase ventilation and air cleaning.
TDM

HOW TO IMPLEMENT AND ANALYZE DEI SURVEYS AT THE WORKPLACE (BEST DEI SURVEY TEMPLATES)

Previous article

THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTORS PROFESSIONALS, STUDENTS & ENTERPRISES SHOULD CONSIDER WHEN CHOOSING A BROADBAND PACKAGE

Next article

You may also like

Comments

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published.

More in TRENDING