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Vacant Land in Fresno

Point2Homes, Zillow, Redfin, Realtor, Trulia, Har, RealEstate, Movoto, LoopNet, and LandandFarm list vacant lands that are available for purchase in the city of Fresno.

1. Point2Homes

  • This site has 37 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

2. Zillow

  • This site has 83 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

3. Redfin

  • This site has 113 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

4. Realtor

  • This site has 133 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

5. Trulia

  • This site has 88 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

6. Har

  • This site has 21 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

7. RealEstate

  • This site has 88 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

8. Movoto

  • This site has 78 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

9. LoopNet

  • This site has 122 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

10. Land and Farm

  • This site has 127 listings for vacant lots in Fresno.
  • The link is here.

Publicly Owned Land, Fresno City & County

Public Lands of CA, California Maps for Sale-Bureau of Land Management, LandCatalog, BLM GLO Records, California Protected Lands Database, CA Department of Fish and Wildlife Land Viewer, and Fresno County Parks and Facilities are seven examples of directories, websites, or databases that show what publicly owned land exists in Fresno City and Fresno County, California. Included below are overviews of each resource.

1. PUBLIC LANDS OF CA

2. CALIFORNIA MAPS FOR SALE-BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

3. LANDCATALOG

4. BLM GLO RECORDS

  • BLM Western State Offices use land status records to document the ongoing state of a township’s Federal and private land regarding title, lease, rights, and usage.
  • These documents include master title plats, which are a composite of all Federal surveys for a township.
  • Other land status records the offices use include “use plats, historical indices, and supplemental plats.”

5. CALIFORNIA PROTECTED LANDS DATABASE

6. CA DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE LAND VIEWER (CDFW)

7. FRESNO COUNTY PARKS AND FACILITIES

Land Owned by Fresno’s RDA Successor Agency

There are 18 land projects managed by Fresno RDA successor agency. The projects are aimed at preventing and eliminating blight in the acquisition and ensure the realization of the area’s potential.

1) AIRPORT AREA REVITALIZATION REDEVELOPMENT AREA

  • The objective of adopting the project area for redevelopment was to retain and expand businesses to improve job accessibility in neighborhood regions.

2) CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT

  • The goal of the project was to prevent and eliminate the spread of blight in the acquisition of property, and rehabilitation of buildings.

3) CENTRAL CITY COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION REDEVELOPMENT AREA

  • The aim of the redevelopment project was to “eliminate blight and economic stagnation and the promotion of the redevelopment of underutilized industrial, commercial, and residential areas within the project area”.

4) CHINATOWN EXPANDED

  • The goal of the project was to eliminate “blight, reverse the trend of economic stagnation, ensure the realization of the project area’s potential for commercial and industrial growth”.

5) CONVENTION CENTER REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA

  • The goal of the project was to eliminate “blight, reverse the trend of economic stagnation, ensure the realization of the project area’s potential for commercial and industrial growth”.

6) FRESNO AIR TERMINAL REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA

  • The aim was to assist the city of Fresno to rebuild and restructure “the 102-acre project area into a high quality, aviation-related business park and address issues on the environment” that were associated with the Old Hammer Field.

7) FRUIT/CHURCH REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA

  • The goals of the project were to prevent and eliminate the spread of blight, promote the private sector and government investment in the project areas, expand existing businesses, improve the supply of housing, and elimination of deficiencies such as inadequate water, insufficient parking, and substandard vehicle circulation.

8) FULTON REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA

  • The goals of the project were to prevent and eliminate the spread of blight, promote the private sector and government investment in the project areas, expand existing businesses, and improve the supply of housing.

9) FREEWAY 99 — GOLDEN STATE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA

The aim of the redevelopment project was to “eliminate blight and economic stagnation and the promotion of the redevelopment of underutilized industrial”, neighborhoods, and commercial areas identified for commercial, residential, and industrial use.

10) JEFFERSON REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA

  • The goals of the project were to prevent and eliminate the spread of blight, promote the private sector and government investment in the project areas, expand existing businesses, and improve the supply of housing.

11) MARIPOSA REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA

  • The goals of the project were to prevent and eliminate the spread of blight, promote the private sector and government investment in the project areas, expand existing businesses, and improve the supply of housing.

12) ROEDING BUSINESS PROJECT

  • The goal of the project was to “help eliminate physical, economic, and social blight in the Roeding Business Park Redevelopment Project Area”.

13) SOUTH VAN NESS INDUSTRIAL PROJECT AREA

  • The goals of the project were to prevent and eliminate the spread of blight, promote the private sector and government investment in the project areas, expand existing businesses, and improve the supply of housing.

14) SOUTHEAST FRESNO REVITALIZATION REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA

The aim of the redevelopment project was to “eliminate blight and economic stagnation and the promotion of the redevelopment of underutilized industrial and commercial areas identified in the city’s general plan” for commercial and industrial use.

15) SOUTH FRESNO REVITALIZATION REDEVELOPMENT AREA

The aim of the redevelopment project was to “eliminate blight and economic stagnation and the promotion of the redevelopment of underutilized industrial and commercial areas identified in the city’s general plan” for commercial and industrial use.

16) SOUTHWEST FRESNO G.N.R.A.

  • The goals of the project were to prevent and eliminate the spread of blight, promote the private sector and government investment in the project areas, expand existing businesses, improve the supply of housing, and elimination of deficiencies such as inadequate water, insufficient parking, and substandard vehicle circulation.

17) WEST FRESNO I REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA

  • The goals of the project were to prevent and eliminate the spread of blight, promote the private sector and government investment in the project areas, expand existing businesses, and improve the supply of housing.

18) WEST FRESNO II REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA.

  • The goals of the project were to prevent and eliminate the spread of blight, promote the private sector and government investment in the project areas, expand existing businesses, and improve the supply of housing.

Lead Based Paint Exposure In Fresno

The neighborhoods of Lowell, Yokomi, Zip code 93701, Kerman and Selma have been identified as worst hit by lead contamination in Fresno.

Housing areas in Fresno, California that have recently been flagged for lead-based paint exposure

  • A recent report by Reuters identified several counties in California that have a high level of lead.
  • The newest zip code-level testing data was released by the California Department of Public Health in response to a longstanding Reuter’s records request and added to a limited set of numbers previously disclosed by the state.
  • In all, Fresno County had nine zip code areas where high lead levels among children tested were at least as typical as in Flint.
  • The report identifies lead paint as the main cause of lead contamination in the county.
  • The worst-hit neighborhoods are Lowell, Yokomi, Zip code 93701, Kerman, and Selma.
  • “Nearly 14 percent of the children under 6 years old who were tested in Fresno’s 93701 ZIP code had levels of 5 micrograms per deciliter of blood or higher, which the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers elevated and of concern.”
  • “The California Department of Public Health reported data of children’s exposure to lead in about one-fourth of the state’s ZIP codes.”

Addresses of Lead-Safe Housing in Fresno

Combating lead contamination in Fresno

  • Following a report that identified Fresno as having high levels of lead contamination, a new $1,000,000 grant was put in place to help clean up homes that have lead paint in Fresno County.
  • The funding gave priority to areas of Southeast and Southwest Fresno that are at high risk because of houses built before 1978.
  • The grant was advanced to the county by the U.S. Department of Housing and “Urban Development’s Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control under the Lead Hazard Control Program.”
  • In total, Fresno County will be able to clean-up 65 homes that have lead-based paints.

Housing Needs

In Fresno, California, families and people with disabilities who rent have problems paying their rent, while single-parent households face issues with housing affordability.

Housing Needs of Persons With Disabilities

  • As of 2014, the latest data available, Fresno’s disabled population receives a stipend of $877 as monthly income known as Supplemental Security Income (SSI).
  • In Fresno, SSI is 22% of the median income of the disabled population. Thus, the SSI constitutes almost a quarter of the income made for many disabled individuals.
  • A one-bedroom living space constitutes about 77% of the SSI which means that more than half of the disabled person’s monthly income would go towards rent.
  • In 2010, a one-bedroom living space constituted 86% of the SSI in Fresno for disabled individuals.
  • Disabled individuals in Fresno have access to housing that meets their physical needs. However, “Priced Out,” a report on the problems disabled individuals face across Californian counties, notes that disabled individuals face a problem of paying for housing rather than finding housing.
  • Disabled individuals often cannot work as much or as in many types of jobs as able individuals, thus, their income coupled with SSI is low. Therefore, even though housing is available in Fresno, many disabled people simply cannot afford to house.

Housing Needs of Families

  • Fresno is considered one of the affordable places to live in California. However, Fresno faces a rental shortage which affects families.
  • About 60% of renter households in Fresno are rent-burdened.
  • Single-family apartments in Fresno cost $975 to rent while single-family homes cost $1,346. Despite the fact that this is lower than most other Californian areas, many Fresno renters still face problems paying their rent.
  • Fresno families do not face problems of finding access to housing. In other words, the housing problem is not one of lack of accesses to housing with enough bedrooms but of the inability for many renters to pay their rents.

Housing Needs of Single-Parent Households

  • About 29.7% of children in Fresno only have a mother present. About 10.3% of children only have a father present.
  • The number of female-only headed households with children was higher in Fresno than for the rest of California (9.9% versus 6.8%).
  • Female-headed households in Fresno have a poverty rate of about 40.1%.
  • While housing exists and is available in Fresno, single-parent households are in need of more affordable housing. In other words, the access problem for single-parent households is one of affordability.

UNDOCUMENTED/MIXED STATUS FAMILIES

  • A proposed rule change by HUD seeking to evict undocumented family members from public housing would negatively affect mixed-status families including families with undocumented parents who have US-born children, and critics call the plan unnecessary and would worsen the current homelessness crisis and housing instability. Of the 1,402 children that will be impacted by this rule, 1,377 of them are US citizens or permanent residents. In total, 2,606 people, including adults in Fresno, would be affected, a total of 570 mixed-status families.
  • Angie Nguyen, the chief of staff of the Fresno Housing Authority cites that other sectors such as the healthcare industry, social services, child welfare services, and education would also feel the effects of the proposed rule.
  • Fresno, California is part of San Joaquin Valley, a rich agricultural area, has many farm laborers and mixed-status families that are struggling to house and support their families. Fresno is rich in culture and diversity, and some have stated that their priority is to ensure that the right protections are in place for undocumented immigrants and their families.
  • Critics state that the Trump administration should be making significant investments in affordable housing options instead of making it harder for people to access housing assistance.

FORMERLY INCARCERATED

HELPFUL FINDINGS:

  • Formerly incarcerated persons are limited by their criminal records in employment and housing options.
  • Coupled with barriers to employment that they face, their rental applications are regularly rejected; these can lead to homelessness or housing insecurity.
  • Based on the most recently available data, in 2008, 2% of formerly incarcerated people in the US were homeless.
  • The 5 million formerly incarcerated persons in the US “are almost ten times more likely to be homeless than the general public.”
  • About 15% of incarcerated persons are homeless in the year before going to prison.
  • More than 10% of the approximately 700,000 persons released from state prisons and an additional 9 million from county jails each year are homeless in the months preceding and following their incarceration.
  • This rate of homelessness and housing insecurity is higher among formerly incarcerated persons with mental illness (20%).

DIVERSE POPULATIONS

  • Fresno has a long history of residential segregation not unlike the rest of the nation, and this legacy is still evident in “California’s poorest large city” and the divide between white, black and brown residents resounds in the city’s geography and creates a system of inequalities along racial lines where groups are denied resources, and then recreates itself. There is more concentrated poverty in south and southwest Fresno than almost anywhere else in the nation.
  • Shaw Avenue is historically known as Fresno’s Mason Dixon line and is still the divider with white, affluent residents living north and west of the line and poor blacks and Hispanics reside in the south and east. Life expectancies differ by 20 years between these regions.
  • The City of Fresno staff and consultants led participants in a facilitated discussion to ascertain the most important concerns in the housing market. Key findings included more diverse housing types in closer proximity to each other, resources should be focused on older neighborhoods to address abandoned homes and related crimes, illegal dumping and poorly maintained rental homes, need more homeless assistance to account for the issue that is growing in all areas of the city, more affordable housing is needed, and access to housing and benefits is limited when the only options is to access via computers.
  • Hispanic populations such as one section in the south houses more than 90,000 people, more than 30,000 Hmong, speak more than 100 languages, the median income is less than half of the rest of the country, and yet residents pay more than 30% of their income for housing that is dilapidated, bug-infested, and often without air in high heat. In addition, many of them don’t have health insurance and are suffering from cuts in social services and education.

Affordable Housing Need, Major Fresno Cities

According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, Fresno County’s affordable housing needs allocation for 2013 to 2023 is 23,640.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

  • According to the San Francisco Housing Inventory report published in 2018, affordable housing are those that are “below 80% of the HUD median”. Basing on this, the categories of extremely-low, very low-income, low-income, and moderate-income are considered to estimate the number of affordable housing units.
  • According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) plan segregates the allocation of housing demand into the following income categories: Very low-income is up to 50% of the median area income, Low-income is 51% to 80% of the median area income., moderate-income is 81% to 120% of the median area income and above moderate-income is above 120% of the median area income.

FRESNO COUNTY

  • According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, population analysis helps in analyzing housing needs.
  • The population of Fresno County in 2000 was 799,407, the 2014 population was 964,040 signifying a 1.3% average growth rate.
  • There was a 14.4% change in the number of households from 2000 to 2010. There were 252,940 households in 2000 and 289,391 households in 2010. This signifies a 1.4% average annual growth.
  • Fresno County’s population is projected to be approximately 1,082,097 in 2020, and 1,300,597 in 2035.
  • According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, Fresno County’s affordable housing needs allocation for 2013 to 2023 is 23,640.

FRESNO CITY

  • The population of Fresno City in 2000 was 427,719, the 2014 population was 515,609 signifying a 1.3% average growth rate.
  • There was a 13.0% change in the number of households from 2000 to 2010. There were 140,079 households in 2000 and 158,349 households in 2010. This signifies a 1.2% average annual growth.
  • According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, Fresno City’s affordable housing needs allocation for 2013 to 2023 is 12,526.

CLOVIS CITY

  • The population of Clovis City in 2000 was 68,516, the 2014 population was 102,188 signifying a 2.9% average growth rate.
  • There was a 37.3% change in the number of households from 2000 to 2010. There were 24,347 households in 2000 and 33,419 households in 2010. This signifies a 3.2% average annual growth.
  • According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, Clovis City’s affordable housing needs allocation for 2013 to 2023 is 4,484.

SANGER CITY

  • The population of Sanger City in 2000 was 18,931, the 2014 population was 24,908 signifying a 2.0% average growth rate.
  • There was a 27.6% change in the number of households from 2000 to 2010. There were 5,220 households in 2000 and 6,659 households in 2010. This signifies a 2.5% average annual growth.
  • According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, Sanger City’s affordable housing needs allocation for 2013 to 2023 is 650.

REEDLEY CITY

  • The population of Reedley City in 2000 was 20,756, the 2014 population was 25,122 signifying a 1.4% average growth rate.
  • There was a 14.0% change in the number of households from 2000 to 2010. There were 5,761 households in 2000 and 6,569 households in 2010. This signifies a 1.3% average annual growth.
  • According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, Reedley City’s affordable housing needs allocation for 2013 to 2023 is 758.

SELMA CITY

  • The population of Selma City in 2000 was 19,444, the 2014 population was 23,977 signifying a 1.5% average growth rate.
  • There was a 14.7% change in the number of households from 2000 to 2010. There were 5,596 households in 2000 and 6,416 households in 2010. This signifies a 1.4% average annual growth.
  • According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, Selma City’s affordable housing needs allocation for 2013 to 2023 is 324.

PARLIER CITY

  • The population of Parlier City in 2000 was 11,145, the 2014 population was 15,019 signifying a 2.2% average growth rate.
  • There was a 34.8% change in the number of households from 2000 to 2010. There were 2,446 households in 2000 and 3,297 households in 2010. This signifies a 3.0% average annual growth.
  • According to the Fresno Multi-Jurisdictional 2015-2023 Housing Element report, Parlier City’s affordable housing needs allocation for 2013 to 2023 is 269.

Infill Development vs Greenfield Development, Fresno County

On average, greenfield development costs less than infill development because of the cost associated with removing existing structures on infill plots. For this reason, developers often prefer greenfield over infill development. However, infill development offers subsidies and tax breaks that are not available to greenfield development.

INFILL DEVELOPMENT

  • Infill development is when private investors or contractors build on vacant or underutilized land that has been previously developed.
  • This type of building in preferred by country officials because it helps with recover the city while leaving open spaces undeveloped.
  • By the year 2035, infill development will account for 45% of Fresno County’s construction.
  • The increasing popularity of infill development is concentrated around the urban inner city and its surrounding neighborhoods.
  • On average, infill development takes longer due to the necessity of removing existing structures, which is both timely and expensive.
  • Infill development is less popular with private investors and builders because of the costs associated with the process. Additionally, it is less popular with these builders because of the limited space to construct large units.
  • The primary fees associated with infill development are the same as greenfield development. However, infill developments offer private investors tax incentives and breaks. These incentives include lenient parking requirements, reduced requirements for curb, gutter, and sidewalk construction, and common trenching for utilities. Additionally, these builders may receive a reduced fee for water and wastewater.
  • Other incentives include property tax exemptions, smaller development impact fees, use of tax financing to aid with the cost of production, and a government product tax.

GREENFIELD DEVELOPMENT

  • Greenfield development is when development takes place on land that has never been used before.
  • This is the preferred type of development by private investors and contractors because there is no need to work around existing structures.
  • The fees associated with developing greenfield spaces vary depending on the type of housing.
  • County officials are trying to steer developers away from greenfield spaces and into infill spaces as a way to improve their inner city and preserve habitats and green spaces outside of the city.

GREENFIELD DEVELOPEMT PRIMARY FEES

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

  • Plan Check: $865
  • Building Permit: $1,330
  • Building Standards Administration Special Revolving Fund: $6
  • Plumbing: $85
  • Mechanical: $78
  • Electrical: $143
  • Demo: $50
  • Zoning Clearance: $150
  • Earthquake Tax: $16
  • Fresno COG: $1,200
  • CHPRD: $1,070
  • HCP Fee: $263
  • Impact Fees: $13,385

FOR MULTIFAMILY HOUSING

  • Plan Check: $573
  • Building Permit: $882
  • Building Standards Administration Special Revolving Fund: $4
  • Plumbing: $85
  • Mechanical: $78
  • Electrical: $83
  • Demo: $50
  • Zoning Clearance: $150
  • Earthquake Tax: $8
  • Fresno COG: $843
  • CHPRD: $936
  • HCP Fee: $70
  • Impact Fees: $11,574

GREENFIELD DEVELOPMENT ADDITIONAL FEES

LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL

MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTAL

  • Wastewater Treatment and Disposal: $5,713
  • Water Treatment Storage and Distribution: $2,111
  • Police Services: $485
  • Fire Services: $489
  • Streets, Through Fares, and Bridges: $1,028 – $1,374
  • Storm Drainage: $460 – 739
  • Parks: $1,177
  • Community Facilities: $329
  • Habitat Conservation Fee: $1,1750 – $5,250
  • Recreation Impact Fees: $936 per dwelling
  • School Impact Fees: $4.80 per square foot
  • Transportation impact Fees: $606

COMMERCIAL

  • Wastewater Treatment and Disposal: $.38 per square foot
  • Water Treatment Storage and Distribution: $0.39 per sq ft
  • Police Services: $.03 per square foot
  • Fire Services: $.03 per square foot
  • Streets, Through Fares and bridges: $1.62 per square foot – $2.17 per square foot
  • Storm Drainage: $5,521 – $8,864
  • Community Facilities: $.02 per square foot
  • Habitat Conservation Fee: $1,1750 – $5,250
  • Recreation Impact Fees: .$18 per square foot
  • School Impact Fees: $.56 per square foot
  • Transportation impact Fees: $1.23 – $1.96 per square foot

INDUSTRIAL

  • Wastewater Treatment and Disposal: $5,713 per EDU (4.5 EDUs per acre)
  • Water Treatment Storage and Distribution: $2,111 per EDU (4.5 EDUs per acre)
  • Police Services: $.01 per sq ft
  • Fire Services: $.01 per square foot
  • Streets, Through Fares, and Bridges: $.28 – $.38 per square foot
  • Storm Drainage: $5,521 – $8,864 per square foot
  • Community Facilities: $.01 per square foot
  • Habitat Conservation Fee: $1,1750 – $5,250
  • Recreation Impact Fees: $.09 per square foot
  • Transportation impact Fees: $.10 – $.39 per square foot

PUBLIC FACILITIES/INSTITUTIONAL

  • Police Services: $.01 per square foot
  • Fire Services: $.01 per square foot
  • Community Facilities: $.01 per square foot
  • Habitat Conservation Fee: $1,1750 – $5,250

Fresno Low Income Down Payments

The average assistance that a low-income family would need in Fresno County is $13,100 for loans that conform to Fannie May/Freddie Mac guidelines. For FHA loans, this will become $9,170.

DEFINITION OF A LOW-INCOME FAMILY

  • According to the NCCP report, a family of four including two children, who receive less than $48,678 per year is considered a low-income family.

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN FRESNO

  • The US Census Bureau reports that the median household income in Fresno was $48,730 in 2017.

AMOUNT OF SAVINGS

  • The Mercury News reports that 37% of Californians have virtually no savings.
  • About 46% of households in California did not put any savings aside in 2017.

AVERAGE HOUSE PRICE IN FRESNO

  • According to Redfin, the average house sale price for the past month in Fresno is $262,000 dollars.

DOWN PAYMENT

  • NewHomeSource states that if the loan conforms to Fannie May or Freddie Mac guidelines, the down payment can be 5% for loans up to $417,000.
  • For FHA loans, the minimum is 3.5% of the house purchase price.

Fresno Credit Score Data

Fresno City, California has an average credit score of 640. Information for Fresno County is not publicly available, but potentially available behind a paywall.

FRESNO CITY CREDIT SCORE

  • According to data drawn from the Experian Aggregated Credit Statistics, Fresno City, California has an average credit score of 640.
  • The data set included all towns and cities with a population above 2,000, and included 735 towns and cities.
  • Fresno tied with Needles, California for the 25th lowest credit score.
  • The average Experian credit score for Americans is 675.

NATIONAL CREDIT SCORE STATISTICS

  • There is a moderate correlate between income and credit score, especially among those ages 65 and younger. In other words, the less money you earn, the lower your credit score, and vice versa.
  • For Americans 65 and older, income and credit score are not closely tied— likely because Americans older than 65 are very likely to be retired, thus having other sources of funds (such as retirement savings, etc.)
  • The older someone is, the better credit they have. According to data from Experian, the average credit score of someone 70 years or older is 730; the average credit of someone between the ages of 21-34 is 634.
  • There is a significant lack of information regarding race/ethnicity and credit scores. The only (and still commonly cited) publicly available large-scale study was done by Freddie Mac and the NAACP in 1999. This study found that black Americans had lower credit scores then their white counterparts.
  • The U.S. Reserve Bank published a report on “the credit circumstances of home buyers” in 2010, the latest data set of its kind available. The average credit score for Black or African American home buyers was 677, followed by “Hispanic white” at 701. “Non-hispanic whites” had an average credit score of 734, and Asians had the highest average credit score at 745.

FRESNO CITY/FRESNO COUNTY DEMOGRAPHICS

Fresno City is: 56.6% white, 7.8% black/African American, 1.1% American Indian/Alaska Native, 13.6% Asian, 0.1% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, and 4.3% two or more races.  Fresno County is: 76.7% white, 5.8% black/African American, 3.0% American Indian/Alaska Native, 11.0% Asian, 0.3% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, and 3.2% two or more races. Fresno City is 49.1% Hispanic or LatinoFresno County is 53.5% Hispanic or Latino In Fresno City, 28.4% of the population lives in poverty.In Fresno County, 21.1% of the population lives in poverty.The 2017 national poverty rate was 12.3%.In Fresno City, the median household income was $44,853.In Fresno County, the median household income was $48,730.The national median household income in the US in 2017 was $61,372.Fresno City and Fresno County are both well above the national average for poverty and well below the national median household income. Based on the Federal Reserve statistics demonstrating the correlation between lower income and lower credit score, we can assume that both Fresno City and Fresno County will have a lower-than-the-national-average credit score. Within different neighborhoods, one can assume that the lower the average income in neighborhood is then the lower the average credit score will be.

Fresno Brownfield Sites

There are 20 Brownfield sites in Fresno, California and they do pose a barrier to housing development due to their hazardous characteristics and negative perception they face by communities. The sanitation work which these sites require directly or indirectly impact the development of houses in the Fresno area.

BROWNFIELD SITES LOCATIONS

  • According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA listings), there are 20 Brownfield sites in the California county of Fresno.

List of Brownfield Sites in Fresno City, California

IMPACT ON HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS

  • Research shows that Brownfield sites have a negative impact on housing and development due to depreciation, which relies on the distance from the property and the Brownfield site.
  • According to the University of Cincinnati, “the total decreased property values associated with Brownfield sites cost the city slightly more than $2.2 million annually in lost property tax revenue.”
  • There is a negative impact on housing development due to unwanted or negative elements that accompany Brownfield sites because of the possible existence of “hazardous substances, pollutants, contaminants,” as stated by the California Association for Local Economic Development.
  • They also have negative effects on public health and creates difficulties for housing development organizations to receive funding for projects as these brownfield sites are likely to be liabilities.

HOUSING DEVELOPMENT BARRIERS

  • Brownfield sites pose a barrier to housing developments because they pose a major financial burden. It costs a significant cash flow to clean and redevelop these contaminated lands before one can consider proceeding with any projects of interest.
  • Limited access to funds reduces the interest and speed in which real estate development firms or associations can operate on. Each of the locations could have housing projects in progress if the lack of contamination or health\environmental safety hazards existed, due to insufficient grants, the process is delayed.

Housing Opportunity Funds

The examples of funds used to support housing opportunities in Fresno City and Fresno County include the permanent supportive housing fund, the rapid housing fund and the veterans housing and homelessness prevention fund.

PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING

RAPID REHOUSING

VETERAND HOUSING AND HOMELESSNESS PREVENTION (VHHP) PROGRAM

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